How to Paint and Distress Crown Royal Bottles

So, what does The Purple Stiletto do with things that most people would throw away? Get creative, of course!

I was presented with some clear glass bottles, the contents having long since been enjoyed. The texture was exactly what I was looking for! This made things interesting and, in some way, made my job easier.

I started by gathering the supplies that I would need for a day of creativity….and waiting for paint to dry.

  • Empty bottles … check!
  • X-I-M primer (because it sticks to glass) … check!
  • Metallic spray (bronze because I’m currently on a dark metallic kick) … check!
  • Latex paint for topcoat (way more than I needed but it was a mistint gallon I changed to suit my mood) … check!
  • Denatured alcohol & rags for distressing … also check!

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With my supplies gathered together, I was ready to prime my glass. Now, I should mention that all adhesive residue and grease had been cleaned from the bottles before I started this project. Also, I realized that the lids may not screw back on correctly if the threads had been painted over, so I decided to tape the opening of the bottles to be on the safe side.

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While I waited for the primer on the glass to dry, I painted the caps with a very small artist brush and practiced walking around in my stilettos.

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After letting the primer COMPLETELY dry on both the bottles and lids (and with aching feet!), I sprayed a couple basecoats of the bronze metallic according to the can instructions. This one specifically said to spray multiple light coats in a one hour window. And, being that it was quite humid when I did this project, it took all of my patience to let the paint dry all the way before moving on to the topcoat.

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After some lunch and a short walk with the dog (not in stilettos), my paint was FINALLY dry! I decided to try rolling the latex topcoat. I have done other projects that I brushed out and was not really happy with the brush strokes. This is nothing but a game of trial and error. As I found out, I did not like the rolling any better. Next time, I think I will try spraying.

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Two coats of latex (and more waiting) later, it was finally time to see what I could create!

Now, I will say I was going to just use a rag to wipe on the denatured alcohol but too much dry time gives one plenty of time to think of other ways to distress.

In the end, I began with a gray scuff pad lightly dipped in the alcohol. I did not want to put too much on, for fear it would eat away more paint in certain areas than I would like. I alternated between the scuff pad and rags, taking off paint only on the raised areas.

When I was happy with the raised areas, I moved on to the center of the bottle. For this, I tried a couple different techniques. The one I liked the best was cutting through certain areas with a piece of sandpaper. Just as I was getting to the metallic layer, I switched to denatured alcohol and a rag. From there, I was able to “buff out” the rough edges made by the sandpaper and reveal just the right amount of bronze. I could plan the “wear spots.”

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The other technique I tried was just continuously wiping the whole center section with alcohol until the bronze wore through. I did not like this as well because I felt it looked a little splotchy when it was done. I much prefer the “planned aging” look!

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I left one bottle center plain. I think it could be used for a monogram or initial. The jury is still out on what to use the blank space for. Perhaps the Purple Stiletto symbol (which I have yet to create)? These are the two completed bottles. Just another day’s work. The Purple Stiletto crafts again!

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Color Me Home Episode 10: Inexpensive Kitchen Updates

On today’s episode, Betsy and Dan discuss some inexpensive projects you can tackle to update your kitchen! They discuss a quick way to make your old cabinets look new again, a way to cover up those old, dated tile backsplashes, and much more!

View our Pinterest Board for Episode 10!

Episode Outline

  • The Gel Stain Fix! (0:52)
  • Can I Lighten My Stained Cabinets With Stain? (5:49)
  • Painting Your Cabinets  (7:10)
  • Get Creative! (20:42)
  • How Do I Apply the Paint? Do I Spray It? Brush It? Roll It? (24:08)
  • Replace the Hardware! (27:01)
  • Update That Dated Tile Backsplash! (28:50)
  • What Finish Should I Use on the Cabinets or the Backsplash? (33:16)

The Gel Stain Fix

Betsy started the episode talking about an easy way to update old and scratched cabinets. Yes, it takes some work.  And yes, you need to do the right prep work . . . but if you do, this can be a great way to update your cabinets very quickly and for very little money. Here’s a blog post that explains the process in detail. And below are some of the photos sent to us by our customer who had such great results!

 Painting Your Cabinets

A second solution we discussed for updating your kitchen is a pretty basic one:  painting the cabinets. It’s not a complicated process, but it does take some time and it definitely requires that you do the proper amounts of prep work to make sure the finished product holds up well. Here are the steps we discussed in the podcast and a brief description. For more information, listen to the podcast and/or check out our blog post on painting kitchen cabinets!

STEP ONE:  Remove the hardware and hinges and label the doors with their location.

STEP TWO:  Clean the surfaces thoroughly using TSP.

STEP THREE:  Scuff-sand the surfaces you’re going to paint.

STEP FOUR:  Prime the cabinets with STIX Waterborne Primer.

STEP FIVE:  Topcoat with a Benjamin Moore’s Advance or RepcoLite’s Hallmark Ceramic.

Those are the basic steps we cover in the podcast. Again, listen to the episode for more details or check out our blog post on painting your cabinets! (Or, better yet, stop out at any RepcoLite, Port City Paints, or Snyder Paints location and we’ll walk you through the whole process!)

Painting An Old Tiled Backsplash

Another topic we discussed on the episode was painting an old, tiled backsplash. The backsplash in a kitchen can often look dated. And usually, people have no idea how to easily fix it. After all, ripping out the tile involves a lot of demolition, sweat, and (in my case) blood. But, there is a quick fix if you’re looking for an easy solution that will buy you some time. And of course, we’re talking about paint! Here are the basic steps. Again, if you’re looking for more detailed info, please check out our blog post on the topic!

STEP ONE:  Clean the surfaces thoroughly using TSP.

STEP TWO:  Prime the cabinets with STIX Waterborne Primer.

STEP THREE:  Topcoat with a Benjamin Moore’s Advance or RepcoLite’s Hallmark Ceramic.

Color Me Home Episode 9: Tips For Selling Your Home Quickly!

On today’s episode, Betsy and Dan discuss some tips for those of you who are thinking about putting your homes on the market. Even though homes are selling faster than they have in recent years, there are still some things that you can do to make sure your home sells quickly AND for as much money as possible….

View our Pinterest Board for Episode 9!

Episode Outline

  • First Impressions Matter (0:52)
  • Start Outside (2:58)
  • Organize, De-Clutter and De-Personalize (11:56)
  • Make Those Small Repairs (19:58)
  • Paint the Walls Neutral? Or Go Bold With Color! (23:42)

Color Me Home Episode 7: Creative Kids’ Rooms (The Chalkboard Paint Episode)

This week, Betsy and Dan discuss specific projects that will help you design remarkably creative kids’ rooms! They discuss ways to use your kids artwork on the walls of their room to add color and interest! And then they shift gears and talk about a number of interesting projects involving Benjamin Moore’s Chalkboard Paint. Also, (and perhaps most importantly), Betsy finds herself unable to say the word “great”, and in the process makes great radio memories….

View our Pinterest Board for Episode 7!

Episode Outline

  • Using Your Kids’ Artwork in their Room (1:26)
    • Betsy Can’t Say “Great” (1:40)
    • Empty Frames (2:33)
    • Corkboard Frames (4:56)
    • Clipboards (5:52)
  • Chalkboard Paint Projects (7:25)
    • There Are Some Dumb Projects Out There (8:02)
    • Paint the Wall (but not in the boring way you’re thinking!) (10:42)
      • Paint Random Shapes (11:08)
      • Replace Your Wallpaper Border with Chalkboard Paint (12:45)
      • Cityscape (14:07)
      • A Tree (15:47)
    • Paint some furniture! (16:35)
    • Chalk Markers (This is Awesome!) (22:21)
    • Various Accessories (27:43)

Frame Their Artwork

We had a lot of fun with this topic and really, we only scratched the surface. This is such a great project for a kid’s room or playrooms because it gives you the chance to put some of their creativity on display, give them some input in the room, and bring in some (typically) bold, vibrant colors without letting them overpower the room.

The ideas we talked about were designed to be easy to change out. When your kids create new art, you (or even they) can swap out older art for newer. The walls can be updated regularly, often, and best of all, easily!

Check out the ideas in the podcast and then, if you come up with something even better, be sure to let us know! Email your photos to colormehome@repcolite.com!

Benjamin Moore Chalkboard Paint

We spent a fair amount of time in this episode talking about Chalkboard Paint from Benjamin Moore. And that’s because we really believe this to be one of the coolest paints available! If you’re even mildly creative, it’s not going to take you long to dream up hundreds of uses. And remember, as we mentioned, Benjamin Moore’s Chalkboard Paint is available in ANY Benjamin Moore color. So, say goodbye to black chalkboards! (Unless of course, that’s what you want.)

Chalk Markers

chalktastic_markers

Betsy made a remarkably bold statement when we started talking about Chalk Markers. She declared that chalk markers were, and I quote, the “greatest invention ever.” Yes. Not one given to overstatement, Betsy firmly places Chalk Markers above electric lights, automobiles, moving pictures, and even computers on her list of “Greatest Inventions of All-Time”. Sorry Edison, Benz, and all you other thinkers and inventors. Sure, Betsy enjoys driving, having lights that go on with the flick of a switch, watching movies, and using her new Mac. But all of those things pale in comparison to doodling with Chalktastic Markers.

I, on the other hand, am a little more grounded and would likely place chalk markers just slightly further down on the list. Still, they’re pretty cool. And they’ll keep a lot of the chalk dust and mess off your floors. Click here for a link to purchase your own set from Amazon. (These are the ones Betsy uses and recommends. And remember, she says they’re the “greatest invention ever.”)

Color Me Home Episode 3: Curb Appeal on a Budget, 1

This week, in honor of the beautiful weather we all experienced over Spring Break, Betsy and Dan discuss some simple exterior projects that will help you increase the curb appeal of your home without breaking the bank!

Episode Outline

  • Front Doors (1:55)
  • What If I’ve Got a Storm Door? (7:34)
  • Careful With Your Color, Though! (12:12)
  • Garage Doors (12:39)
  • Shutters (13:40)
  • Vinyl Safe Paint and Colors (15:20)
  • How to Paint Your Shutters (18:20)
  • A Quick Miracle Fix to Revive Faded Shutters (21:51)
  • Mailboxes (25:40)

Before and After Homes with Shutters!

As we mentioned in the podcast, adding shutters to a home can make a tremendous difference. And while I’d love to share a large gallery of photos making our case, I don’t have the rights! So, I’m doing the next best thing: Here’s a google image search that will allow you to see exactly what we’re talking about!

Check it out! And we’re betting that if you don’t already have shutters on your home, after seeing those photos, you’ll move that project to the top of your list.

Vinyl Safe Colors

Benjamin Moore’s Revive is available in a wide variety of vinyl safe colors. Check out the full palette!vinyl_safe_colors_revive4

Penetrol Fix for Shutters

We talked about this at the 21:51 mark on the podcast and if you didn’t hear it, you should listen in to know exactly what these notes refer to. At any rate, I was able to dig up the photos that I took when I applied Penetrol to my shutters early last Spring. The first photo shows the shutter before application–faded and chalky. The next two obviously show the shutter in process. The final photo of the house shows the shutter finished and the surrounding trim cleaned up.

It’s definitely a project to try if you’re looking for a quick and easy way to restore the color of the vinyl. Just be aware, it’s not a long-lasting fix. You’ll typically get anywhere from 6 months to a year out of it. A full paint job is going to last much longer!

 

From Bottle to Vase in 6 Easy Steps

paintedbottles_030716_4If you’re into decorating and if you’ve got even the slightest amount of creativity, you’re always looking for a project. Something outside the norms, something a little different, little things that will set your home and your decorating apart from everyone else.

Well, if that’s you–if you’d love a quick project with a huge payoff–then read on!

Betsy Thompson, at our 17th Street Store, came up with the following project. And I’ve got to admit, when I walked by and saw her working on this in the store, I was intrigued. In my opinion, it’s one of those perfect projects: easy, inexpensive, and there’s no limit to what you could do with it.

Now, the concept behind this project is simple. Betsy taped off or masked off sections of the bottles and then painted them. Once the paint was dry, she removed the tape or masking to reveal areas that received no paint, thus creating the designs.

To do this on your own, all you need to do is follow these simple steps:

1. OBTAIN SOME BOTTLES

The bottles Betsy used for our project are a dark green. Any color glass would work, but clear glass might not provide you with quite the same contrast in the finished look.

2. CREATE YOUR DESIGNS

To create your designs, you can use tape, stickers, or whatever else you can come up with! In her project, Betsy used a combination of masking tape and scrapbooking border stickers. Simply apply the stickers and tape over the bottles in whatever patterns you would like to create. Get creative here and don’t be afraid to experiment with a few different looks!

3. IT’S TIME TO PRIME

Glass is a tough surface to get paint to bond to, so it’s necessary to use a special primer. Betsy used XIM primer to solve this problem and to give the finish paint a good surface to adhere to. XIM is what we call a “bonding primer” and is designed to bond to tough-to-paint surfaces like porcelain, tile, glass, plastics, and more. So it’s the perfect primer for this project.

4. SPRAY ON THE FINISH PAINT

When the primer is dried (typically anywhere from 20 – 40 minutes), it’s time for your finish paint. Betsy used white spray paint. She applied a couple coats to ensure solid coverage and then left it to dry.

5. REMOVE THE STICKERS

This can be somewhat tricky and requires a little patience to do it well. You may want to carefully run an X-Acto knife along all the edges to cut through any paint film that might have formed over both the bottle and the tape. Failing to do this could result in peeling paint off the bottle when you remove your tape. At any rate, carefully remove the tape, the stickers, or whatever it was you used to mask the bottle off.

6. A LITTLE CLEANUP and then ENJOY!

Once that’s all done, you’re basically finished! You may need to clean up any areas where the paint bled under your tape or stickers, but you can do that with your X-Acto knife or, if you start soon enough, a little of the proper cleanup solvent on a Q-tip.

This is a simple project with a huge payoff!  You create a very unique piece that’s perfect for displaying cut flowers, dried flowers, or just sitting empty on a shelf.

Give it a try and see what you can come up with. Experiment with different designs and paint colors. Get creative and post your projects in the comments section below! We’d love to see what you’re working on.